Tysons Dentistry
pediatric dental care | vienna va

Two Factors That Contribute to Cavities in Kids

August 24, 2017
|
Posted By: Dr. Ardalan Sanati
children's dentistry | pediatric dentistry | vienna va

Unfortunately, your child’s mouth is a haven for bacteria. The moist, warm environment creates a perfect breeding ground, resulting in thousands of bacteria. Since bacteria love to feed on sugar, the more sugar your child has in their mouth, the more bacteria will develop.

Bacteria and Tooth Decay

For a long time, the bacteria Streptococcus mutans has been blamed for tooth decay. But recently, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine in Philadelphia authored a study that Candida albicans, a yeast bacteria is almost always present in the plaque of children with cavities. This finding suggests that the cause of dental caries may be a combination of the two. However, candida yeast does not bind to Streptococcus mutans unless it is in a sugar-rich environment.

The bottom line is that both bacterial and fungal microorganisms may be to blame for the development of childhood caries. The research indicates that new therapies are needed to target these interactions and reduce the risk of cavities in kids.

Protect Your Child’s Oral Health

Until then, you need to be aware that sugar, especially consumed in liquid form, gets into the hard-to-reach areas of your child's teeth. Regular brushing is essential, but it can be difficult to remove these sugars, which encourages the growth of harmful bacteria.

However, you can easily break the sugar-bacteria cycle by monitoring your child’s brushing habits and scheduling routine appointments for exams and cleanings. Don’t allow your kids to consume sugary drinks all day, and never let them fall asleep with a juice-filled bottle.

If you are looking for a Vienna, VA dentist who can address childhood caries and offer preventive treatments like fluoride applications and dental sealants to support good oral health, please call Tysons Dentistry. We will be happy to answer your questions and also offer advice for childhood dental concerns like thumb-sucking and bottle feeding.

If you have difficulty using our website, please email us or call us at (703) 442-0770
View the ADA Accessibility Statement